Eaton, Ohio

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Eaton, Ohio
Preble County Courthouse downtown
Official seal of Eaton, Ohio
Motto(s): 
"A Rural Community Growing In To The Future"
Location in Ohio
Location in Ohio
Location of Eaton in Preble County
Location of Eaton in Preble County
Coordinates: 39°44′51″N 84°38′2″W / 39.74750°N 84.63389°W / 39.74750; -84.63389Coordinates: 39°44′51″N 84°38′2″W / 39.74750°N 84.63389°W / 39.74750; -84.63389
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyPreble
Government
 • MayorJoe Renner
Area
 • Total6.28 sq mi (16.26 km2)
 • Land6.27 sq mi (16.24 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.02 km2)  0.16%
Elevation
1,040 ft (320 m)
Population
 • Total8,375
 • Density1,333.6/sq mi (501.55/km2)
 census
Time zoneUTC−4 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Zip code
45320
Area code(s)937, 326
FIPS code39-24234[3]
GNIS feature ID1040043[4]
WebsiteCity website

Eaton is a city in, and the county seat of, Preble County, Ohio, United States;[5] it is located approximately 24 mi (38 km) west of Dayton, and is part of the Dayton metropolitan area. The population was 8,375 at the 2020 census, down 0.4% from the population of 8,407 at the 2010 census.[6] Eaton's sister city is Rödental bei Coburg (Germany).

History[edit]

Eaton was founded and platted in 1806 by William Bruce.[7] The village derives its name from Gen. William Eaton[8] (1764–1811), the U.S. Consul at Tunis, who led a diverse army in a harrowing march from Egypt to Tripoli to meet the U.S. Naval forces. In addition to the city of Eaton and the county of Preble, various streets in Eaton (Barron, Decatur, Israel, Wadsworth, and Somers) were named in honor of heroes of the First Barbary War and the Second Barbary War.[9]

The town grew quickly following its establishment. In 1846, the town first had 1000 inhabitants. This growth was primarily derived from the town's location at the strategic junction of two turnpikes. In 1849, Eaton was the site of a cholera outbreak. About half of the inhabitants fled; of the remaining 600 people, 120 died.[1]

19th century fire[edit]

In June 1859 a fire in Eaton destroyed thirteen of its primary business establishments. The total loss was estimated at $40,000 to $50,000. Caused by incendiaries, the fire scorched the courthouse and left it a brown color. The disaster was first reported by the Cincinnati Commercial.[10]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.20 square miles (16.06 km2), of which 6.19 square miles (16.03 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[11]

The city includes Crystal Lake and Seven Mile Creek. Parks include: Fort St. Clair, Water Works Park, 7-Mile Park, and Clarence Hook Memorial Park.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820255
1830510100.0%
184085968.4%
18501,34656.7%
18701,748
18802,14322.6%
18902,93436.9%
19003,1557.5%
19103,1871.0%
19203,2100.7%
19303,3474.3%
19403,5526.1%
19504,24219.4%
19605,03418.7%
19706,02019.6%
19806,83913.6%
19907,3968.1%
20008,13310.0%
20108,4073.4%
20208,375−0.4%
Sources:[3][12][13][14][15][16][17]

2020 census[edit]

As of the 2020 United States Census, there were 8,375 people living in Eaton. The racial makeup of the city was 92.8% white, 0.9% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.9% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 0.6% from other races, and 4.5% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity made up 1.2% of the population.[18]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 8,407 people, 3,486 households, and 2,181 families living in the city. The population density was 1,358.2 inhabitants per square mile (524.4/km2). There were 3,903 housing units at an average density of 630.5 per square mile (243.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.3% White, 0.6% African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.8% of the population.

There were 3,486 households, of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.2% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.4% were non-families. 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.90.

The median age in the city was 40.4 years. 23.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.7% were from 25 to 44; 25.7% were from 45 to 64; and 19.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.2% male and 52.8% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 8,133 people, 3,274 households, and 2,183 families living in the city. The population density was 1,434.2 people per square mile (553.8/km2). There were 3,467 housing units at an average density of 611.4 per square mile (236.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.02% White, 0.39% African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.07% from other races, and 0.85% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.57% of the population.

There were 3,274 households, out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.3% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.3% were non-families. 29.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 24.0% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 18.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,231, and the median income for a family was $42,241. Males had a median income of $32,404 versus $24,006 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,771. About 5.8% of families and 8.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.0% of those under age 18 and 9.5% of those age 65 or over.

Arts and culture[edit]

Eaton, 2021

Eaton hosts the annual Preble County Pork Festival, held the third full weekend each September, and the summer Preble County Fair.

Downtown Eaton is home to Preble Arts, the art center of Preble County Art Association.

Eaton has a branch and administrative offices of the Preble County District Library.[19]

Education[edit]

Eaton Community Schools operates two elementary schools, one middle school, and Eaton High School.[20]

Edison State Community College operates a satellite campus in Eaton.[21]

Notable people[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  3. ^ a b c "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2012-07-12. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  6. ^ Eaton city, Preble County, Ohio Demographics and Housing 2020 Decennial Census | cincinnati.com
  7. ^ Overman, William Daniel (1958). Ohio Town Names. Akron, OH: Atlantic Press. p. 41.
  8. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 113.
  9. ^ "Eaton, Ohio - Ohio History Central".
  10. ^ Disastrous Incendiary Fire at Eaton, Ohio, The New York Times, June 9, 1859, pg. 8.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  12. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Ninth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. 1870. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  13. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. 1880. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  14. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  15. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  16. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. 1960. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  17. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  18. ^ Eaton city, Preble County, Ohio Demographics and Housing 2020 Decennial Census | cincinnati.com
  19. ^ "Locations". Preble County District Library. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  20. ^ "Homepage". Eaton Community Schools. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  21. ^ "Sinclair in Eaton". Sinclair Community College. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  22. ^ Jane LeCompte - Author of Moon Passage Retrieved 2018-06-05.
  23. ^ Eaton diver Kent Vosler fondly recalls Games Retrieved 2018-06-05.

External links[edit]