Antonov An-28

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An-28
PZL-Mielec An-28, Chaika Avia Company AN1414321.jpg
Antonov An-28
Role Short-range airliner
Manufacturer WSK PZL Mielec
Design group Antonov
First flight September 1969
Introduction 1986
Status Operational
Primary user Aeroflot (former)
Produced 1975–1993
Number built 191
Developed from Antonov An-14
Variants PZL M28
Developed into Antonov An-38

The Antonov An-28 (NATO reporting name Cash) is a twin-engined light turboprop transport aircraft, developed from the Antonov An-14M. It was the winner of a competition against the Beriev Be-30, for use by Aeroflot as a short-range airliner.[1] It first flew in 1969. A total of 191 were built and 16 remain in airline service as at August 2015.[2] After a short pre-production series built by Antonov, it was licence-built in Poland by PZL-Mielec. In 1993, PZL-Mielec developed its own improved variant, the PZL M28 Skytruck.

Development[edit]

The An-28 is similar to the An-14 in many aspects, including its wing structure and twin rudders, but features an expanded fuselage and turboprop engines, in place of the An-14's piston engines. The An-28 first flew as a modified An-14 in 1969. The next preproduction model did not fly until 1975. In passenger carrying configuration, accommodation was provided for up to 15 people, in addition to the two-man crew.[3] Production was transferred to PZL-Mielec in 1978. The first Polish-built aircraft did not fly until 1984. The An-28 finally received its Soviet type certificate in 1986.

Variants[edit]

An-14A
The original Antonov designation for an enlarged, twin-turboprop version of the An-14.
An-14M
Prototype.
An-28
Twin-engined short-range utility transport aircraft, three built.
An-28RM Bryza 1RM
Search and rescue, air ambulance aircraft.
An-28TD Bryza 1TD
Transport version.
An-28PT
Variant with Pratt & Whitney engines first flown 22 July 1993.

Operators[edit]

Civil operators[edit]

An-28 on USSR postal stamp

Major operators of the 16 Antonov An-28 aircraft remaining in airline service include:

 Armenia
 Russia
 Tajikistan

Former operators[edit]

 Kazakhstan
 Kyrgyzstan
 Moldova
 Suriname
  • Blue Wing Airlines (formerly operated five with three lost in crashes on 3 April 2008, 15 October 2009, and 15 May 2010)

Military operators[edit]

 Georgia
 Tanzania

Former military operators[edit]

 Djibouti
 Peru

Former operators[edit]

 Estonia
 Soviet Union

Notable accidents and incidents[edit]

Specifications (An-28)[edit]

Comparison of the An-14 and the An-28

Data from Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1993–94[11]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Capacity:
    • 17 passengers or
    • 1,750 kg (3,860 lb)
  • Length: 13.10 m (43 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 22.06 m (72 ft 5 in)
  • Height: 4.90 m (16 ft 1 in)
  • Wing area: 39.72 m2 (427.5 sq ft)
  • Airfoil: TsAGI R-II-14 (14% thickness)
  • Empty weight: 3,900 kg (8,598 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 6,500 kg (14,330 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: 1,960 L (430 imp gal; 520 US gal)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Glushenkov TVD-10B turboprop engines, 720 kW (960 shp) each
  • Propellers: 3-bladed AW-24AN, 2.80 m (9 ft 2 in) diameter

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 350 km/h (220 mph, 190 kn) at 3,000 m (9,800 ft)
  • Cruise speed: 335 km/h (208 mph, 181 kn) at 3,000 m (9,800 ft)
  • Never exceed speed: 390 km/h (240 mph, 210 kn)
  • Range: 1,365 km (848 mi, 737 nmi) (max fuel, 1,000 kg (2,200 lb) payload)
  • Service ceiling: 6,000 m (20,000 ft)
  • g limits: +3
  • Rate of climb: 8.3 m/s (1,640 ft/min)
  • Take-off run to 10.7 m (35 ft): 410 m (1,350 ft)
  • Landing run from 15 m (50 ft): 315 m (1,033 ft)

See also[edit]

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lundgren, Johan (1996–2006). "The Antonov/PZL Mielec An-28". Airliners.net. AirNav Systems LLC. Archived from the original on 18 June 2006. Retrieved 1 July 2006.
  2. ^ Morrison, Murdo; Fafard, Antoine (31 July 2015). "World Airliner Census 2015". Flightglobal Insight. Flight International (Flightglobal, published 11 August 2015)
  3. ^ Green, W. 1976. The Observer's Book of Aircraft. (25th ed.) Frederick Warne & Co. pp. 254. ISBN 0-7232-1553-7
  4. ^ Hoyle 2016, p. 35.
  5. ^ Hoyle 2016, p. 48.
  6. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Antonov 28 ES-NOV Kärdla". aviation-safety.net.
  7. ^ "Accident description". Aviation safety network. Archived from the original on 30 October 2009. Retrieved 18 October 2009.
  8. ^ "9Q-CUN? Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 5 February 2012.
  9. ^ "RA-28715 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 12 September 2012.
  10. ^ "10 dead in An-28 plane crash in Russia's Far East". Retrieved 12 September 2012.
  11. ^ Lambert 1993, pp. 231–233
  • Hoyle, Craig (6–12 December 2016). "World Air Forces Directory". Flight International. Vol. 190 no. 5566. pp. 22–53. ISSN 0015-3710.
  • Lambert, Mark, ed. (1993). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1993–94. Coulsdon, UK: Jane's Data Division. ISBN 0-7106-1066-1.

External links[edit]